February 16, 2020 Frankie LaBow

How Technology is Changing the Dating Game

By: Frankie LaBow

     These days technology plays a role in our everyday lives and impacts nearly everything under the sun. From food, shopping, and gaming to research, blogging, and even dating. Online dating sites have entirely transformed the dating world. Digital match-making has broken down boundaries and perhaps is causing stronger and longer-lasting relationships. 

     30 years ago, the average response to “How did you guys meet?” was either from a family member or a friend introducing the two people. According to a Stanford study, in 1990 nearly 35% of couples met through friends and nearly 0% met on the internet. In 2000, 10% of opposite-sex couples and 20% of same-sex couples met online. When Tinder was introduced to the world in 2012, the percentage of spouses who met online dramatically rose to 29% of opposite-sex couples and 65% of same-sex couples. Today, around 40% of heterosexual relationships meet online. The number of relationships initiated by friends or family is actively decreasing. 

   

     Today there are 50 million people on Tinder and 2 billion swipes per day. There are 1 million tinder dates every week. Surveys show that ⅓ of the couples in the United States have met online.

      Online dating systems have tremendous advantages including finding someone who shares common interests or beliefs and the number of potential partners. Even if you are picky and have a very particular taste, the larger selection increases the possibility of finding someone who suits you.

      The amount of interracial marriages who met online is increasingly on the rise. According to the author Alia Hoyt, 15% of new marriages were interracial in 2009. After Tinder was launched in 2012, the percentage of interracial marriages jumped to 17%. 

   

    Online dating apps supposedly build stronger relationships than meeting through friends or family. Study has shown that couples who meet online are more likely to get married sooner than couples who meet offline. Married couples who meet online have a higher chance of staying together. One study by the author Peggy Drexler:

“According to the study, the rate of marital breakups for respondents who met their spouse online was 25% lower than for those who met offline. The researchers suggested that a greater pool of potential spouses might give users more options and allow them to be more selective.”

The ability to hypothetically “shop” for a spouse online has entirely revolutionized dating and marriage. It builds stronger, long-term relationships at a much faster rate than ever seen before.

 

SOURCES:

https://mashable.com/article/online-dating-change-world/

https://www.sciencealert.com/this-is-how-online-dating-has-changed-the-very-fabric-of-society

https://computer.howstuffworks.com/internet/social-networking/networks/online-dating-is-increasing-interracial-marriage.htm